ON MAKING NOTHING BUT MONEY: Henry Ford

A business that makes nothing but money
is a poor business.

ford henry.jpg

— Henry Ford *


 

 

 

YOU CAN TELL A LOT ABOUT A COMPANY AND ITS LEADERS BY LOOKING AT THE GOALS THEY SET.

If every goal has a dollar sign next to it, Henry Ford probably wouldn't approve. Neither would most strategic leaders.

Without goals focused on meeting needs, solving problems, building people, improving things, creating cool stuff that makes our work or our life more fun or more productive — or finding ways to do things better, faster, cheaper, and smarter — what good would it all be?

Oh, and doing things at work you can truly be proud of. I doubt most kids brag about parents who made their numbers last quarter.

Henry Ford made a lot of money by understanding that business is about far more than money. How do your goals stack up?...




 

Carl Francis
CFrancis@Envisian.com
610.640.4600 ex 1

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* During early years working for Thomas Edison, Henry Ford (1863–1947) caught the attention of capitalists who invested in his vision of an automobile that middle class Americans could afford.

After many failures, he founded Ford Motor Company, later introducing the Model T, a vehicle which converted the automobile from an expensive curiosity into a practical conveyance and profoundly impacted the twentieth century.

Always searching for efficiency and lower costs, Ford introduced moving assembly belts into his plants in 1913, which enabled an enormous increase in production. Although Ford is often credited with the idea,  the concept and its development came from four of his employees.

Henry Ford became one of the richest and best-known people in the world, largely through mass production of inexpensive goods coupled with high wages for workers. Ford had a global vision, with consumerism as the key to peace. His intense commitment to systematically lowering costs resulted in many technical and business innovations, including a franchise system that put dealerships in major cities on six continents.