OPPOSING WHAT WE DIDN'T CREATE... Alexander Hamilton

CAMPAIGN 2016: Looking for a little wisdom from past leaders

Men often oppose a thing merely because
they had no part in planning it,
or because it was planned by
those whom they dislike.

Alexander Hamilton, Founding Father, Finance Expert
 

 WHAT WAS TRUE IN HAMILTON'S TIME IS STILL TRUE.

How much do we oppose simply because others grabbed it first?

Tax reform. Environmental protection. Educational standards. Military action. Gun control. Reproductive rights. Open space preservation. Immigration reform.

Your side has your issues. We have ours.

Even little kids aren't this stupid. If one has a good idea, a game, or a funny joke, most children will join right in. Not in politics.

Who taught us to hate what others create or believe? Who taught us to be threatened by ideas that are different from ours?

 

Carl Francis
CFrancis@Envisian.com

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BEFORE ALEXANDER HAMILTON WAS THE HOTTEST TICKET ON BROADWAY, he was one of our American Founding Fathers.

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804) was a chief military aide to General George Washington, one of the most influential promoters of the U.S. Constitution, the founder of America's financial system, the founder of the Federalist Party (the world's first voter-based political party), the founder of the United States Coast Guard and the founder of The New York Post newspaper.

Born out of wedlock, raised in the West Indies and orphaned as a child, Hamilton pursued a college education with the help of local wealthy men. Recognized for his abilities and talent, he was sent to King's College (now Columbia University) in New York City.

Hamilton played a major role in the American Revolution.

Hamilton became the leading cabinet member in the new government under President Washington. He believed in a strong central government and argued for the legal authority to fund the national debt, assume states' debts, and create the government-backed Bank of the United States.

As the first Secretary of the Treasury, Hamilton developed the economic policies of the George Washington administration. Hamilton took the lead in the funding of the states' debts by the Federal government, the establishment of a central national bank, a system of tariffs, and friendly trade relations with Britain. He led the Federalist Party, created largely in support of his views; he was opposed by the Democratic-Republican Party, led by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, who despised Britain and feared that Hamilton's policies of a strong central government would weaken the American commitment to Republicanism.

When Jefferson and Aaron Burr tied for the presidency in the Electoral College in 1801, Hamilton helped to defeat Burr, whom he found unprincipled, and elect Jefferson instead.

When Vice President Burr later ran for governor of New York state in 1804, Hamilton crusaded against him as unworthy. Taking offense at some of Hamilton's comments, Burr challenged him to a duel in 1804 and mortally wounded Hamilton, who died the next day.